Dec
2017

The Greek word “ἐγκάθετος”

Limited to Lk. 20:20, the Greek adjective “enkathetos” meant “spy” or “lying in wait,” “lying in ambush.”  Men, pretending to be honest, were sent to spy on Jesus.  These fellows hoped to hear Jesus say something which could be reported to Pilate as evidence against Him.

Dec
2017

The Greek word “ἐγείρω”

Found a hundred and forty-four times in the New Testament, the Greek verb “egeiro” meant “raise,” “be raised,” “wake up.”  The basic meaning of this term is wake from sleep (Mt. 1:24; 2:13-14, 20-21; 8:26; Mk. 4:27).  In Rom. 13:11 and Eph. 5:14, this word egeiro “is a metaphor for the cessation of a manner of life which belongs to the night and death” (Exegetical Dictionary of the New Testament, 1:372).  Jesus’ resurrection is described with the passive form of this verb in thirty one places (ibid, p. 374).

Dec
2017

The Greek word “ἐγγύς”

Found thirty-two times in the New Testament, the Greek adverb “engus” meant “close to” or “near.”  Jesus spoke of “summer drawing night” (Mt. 24:32).  A Passover was “at hand” (Jn. 2:13).  Bethany was “nigh” to Jerusalem (Jn. 11:18).  Jesus was crucified “nigh” to the city” (Jn. 19:20).  Gentiles were “made nigh” by the blood of Christ (Eph. 2:13).  When writing the book of Revelation, John used this term to begin and end this book (Rev. 1:3; 22:10).  John claimed the events he wrote about were “at hand” versus thousands of years later.

Dec
2017

The Greek word “ἐγγράφω”

Limited to Lk. 10:20 and 2 Cor. 3:2-3, the Greek verb “engrapho” meant “write upon,” “engrave,” “inscribe.”  Jesus spoke about names being “written” in heaven (Lk. 10:20).  Paul also used this term when writing to the Corinthians.

Nov
2017

The Greek word “ἐγγίζω”

Found more than forty times in the New Testament, the Greek verb “engizo” meant “come near,” “approach,” “bring near.”  In Mt. 3:2, the first time this term is used in the New Testament, the meaning is “at hand” (John the Baptist was speaking about the kingdom of God).  This same sense is found in Mt. 4:17 where Jesus spoke about the kingdom.  Along with describing the kingdom of God which was established in the first century (compare Mk. 9:1; Col. 1:13), this term is also associated with the hour of Jesus’ betrayal (Mt. 26:45), drawing near to a city (Lk. 19:41), and drawing near to God (Jas. 4:8).

Nov
2017

“Ἑβραϊστί”

Limited to Jn. 5:2; 19:13, 17, 20; 20:16; Rev. 9:11; 16:16,”Hebraisti” meant “In Hebrew” or “in the Hebrew language.”

The Exegetical Dictionary of the New Testament (1:370) suggested the references in John “probably” use this term “to provide historical details” and the book of Revelation contains this term “to intensify the strangeness of what is portrayed.”

Nov
2017

“Ἑβραῖος”

Limited to Acts 6:1; 2 Cor. 11:22; Phil. 3:5, Hebraios” described someone who was a Hebrew.  This designation is far less common in the New Testament than the word “Jew.”

The Dictionary of New Testament Theology (2:305) claims this “is an old word of uncertain meaning,” and “was used by other peoples in the old stories sometimes in a derogatory manner, sometimes by Israel in dealings with foreigners in a self-depreciating manner” (ibid).