Feb
2013

The Greek word aner

Found numerous times in the New Testament and used in every book but Philippians, First and Second Thessalonians, Second Timothy, Philemon, Hebrews, Second Peter, and First-Third John, the Greek noun “aner” described males.  In some places this term has the added sense of a husband or bridegroom.

Joseph is identified as the “husband” of Mary (Mt. 1:16).  Jesus spoke of a “wise man” (Mt. 7:24) as well as a “foolish man” (Mt. 7:26).  Seven “men” (males) were selected to fill the need described in Acts 6:3.  Paul addressed the “men” of Athens (Acts 17:22).  Men (males) are not to have covered heads (1 Cor. 11:4, 7).  Rather than have ladies take on a worship role in mixed assemblies, men (males) are to do things like preach and pray (1 Tim. 2:8, 12).  Paul confirmed this point in 1 Cor. 14:35, a place where aner is also used. A male is to be the “husband of his wife” (Eph. 5:23).  “Husbands” are to love their wives (Eph. 5:25).  Wives are to be in subjection to their “husbands” (1 Pet. 3:1).