Sep
2011

The Greek word adiaphthoria

Found only once in the Greek New Testament (Tit. 2:7), the Greek noun “adiaphthoria” means “integrity” or a lack of corruptness.

The main part of this word (diaphthora) describes “corruption” or “decay.” By adding a simple “a” to the prefix of this term the meaning changes from “corruption” to “non-corruption.” The English language does a similar thing with prefixes like “un” (words like “finished” are immediately changed to “unfinished”).

Paul wanted Titus to have “uncorrupt” doctrine; this is also God’s will for our day and time. We need to know the truth, teach the truth, and obey the truth (Jn. 8:31-32).

Sep
2011

The Greek word adialeiptos

Found only twice in the Greek New Testament (Rom. 9:2; 2 Tim. 1:3), the adjective “adialeiptos” means “continual” or “unceasing.” Secular writers used this word to describe a continuing cough, but Paul used this term to describe “continual pain/sorrow” (Rom. 9:2) and his “unceasing remembrance of Timothy” when he prayed (2 Tim. 1:3).

Sep
2011

The Greek word adiakritos

Found only once in the Greek New Testament (Jas. 3:17), the adjective “adiakritos” means “impartial.” Those who possess this quality refuse to make unnecessary distinctions between those who are great and those who are not. This term also implies firmness; the “adiakritos” person is someone who stays with the gospel instead of “changes with the times.” Stated another way, this quality means a child of God refuses to conform to the “new” ideas and philosophies of the world.

Sep
2011

The Greek word Hades

Found just eleven times in the New Testament and usually translated “hell” or “grave” in the KJV, the Greek noun “hades” describes what many refer to as the “underworld.” In the Old Testament the hadean realm is referred to as “sheol.”

The eleven verses in the New Testament that use the word “hades” are: Mt. 11:23; 16:18; Lk. 10:15; 16:23; Acts 2:27, 31; 1 Cor. 15:55; Rev. 1:18; 6:8; 20:13, 14.

Some teach “hades” was where the righteous and unrighteous went up until the time of Jesus’ resurrection, but now the righteous are immediately taken to heaven instead of abiding in the “good side” of hades (Lk. 16:25). Others, including this author, believe hades serves as a holding place for all who die (Lk. 16:23) and teach this place will continue to exit and hold the dead until Jesus returns and then destroys this place (Rev. 20:13-14).

If hades is still the current dwelling place for the righteous who die, there is a “great gulf” (barrier) that separates them from the lost (Lk. 16:26).

Sep
2011

The Greek word ademoneo

Found only three times in the New Testament (Mt. 26:37; Mk. 14:33; Phil. 2:26), the Greek verb “ademoneo” means “to be distress” or “troubled.” The references in Matthew and Mark describe Jesus’ “distress” in Gethsemane. Paul used this term in Phil. 2:26 to describe Epaphroditus’ anxiety over those at Philippi who were concerned about his health.

Sep
2011

The Greek adverb adelos

The Greek word “adelos” is used both as an adjective and an adverb in the New Testament. The adjective form of this word is used in Lk. 11:44 and 1 Cor. 14:8. The adverb form of this word, which also happens to be spelled adelos when giving its English equivalent, is found only once in the New Testament (1 Cor. 9:26). Paul told the Corinthians to not run in an “uncertain” way (i.e. they were to have a definite goal).

Sep
2011

The Greek word adelos

Used only twice in the New Testament (Lk. 11:44; 1 Cor. 14:8), the Greek adjective “adelos” has the sense of “unseen” or “uncertain.”  Luke used this term to describe “unknown” graves.  Paul used this word when discussing spiritual gifts.  He said men cannot know what a trumpet sound means if the sounds from this instrument are “unclear.”  For a discussion of this word in 1 Cor. 14, see the free online first Corinthians commentary for 1 Cor. 14.

There is also a full length and “free online First Corinthians commentary” that you can access chapter by chapter.

Sep
2011

The Greek word adelphotes

Related to the Greek noun “adelphos” (brother), the noun “adelphotes” means “brotherhood.”  This word occurs two times in the New Testament and both of these places are in the book of First Peter (1 Pet. 2:17; 5:9).

The word “brotherhood” is somewhat like the word “church” (it describes a “group” of fellow Christians who are both male and female).

This word is not found in Classical or Non-Classical Greek prior to the LXX.

Aug
2011

The Greek word adelphos

Similar to the Greek noun “adelphe” (sister, a Christian sister), the Greek noun “adelphos” means “brother” in a literal or physical sense or “brother” in the sense of a fellow Christian.  This term is one of the more common nouns in the New Testament (it is found about 350 times) and it occurs in every New Testament book except Titus and Second John.