Jan
2018

The Greek word “ἐγκρατής”

Limited to Tit. 1:8, the Greek adjective “enkrates” meant “disciplined,” “temperate,” “sober.”  A qualification for elders (Tit. 1:5), a function which is also described as “bishops” (Tit. 1:7), is discipline.

Jan
2018

The Greek word “ἐγκρατεύομαι”

Limited to 1 Cor. 7:9 and 1 Cor. 9:25, the Greek verb “enkrateuomai” meant “abstain from something” or “exercise self-control.”

Paul advised marriage for those who struggle with sexual “self-control.”  In 1 Cor. 9:25, this word is applied to the self-control needed by both athletes and Christians.

Jan
2018

The Greek word “ἐγκράτεια”

Limited to Acts 24:25; Gal. 5:23; 2 Pet. 1:6, the Greek noun “enkrateia” meant “self-control” or “temperance.”

“Considering the great importance given to the theme of self-control in Greco-Roman ethics, one is surprised by the relatively little attention paid to it in the NT” (Silva, 1:84).  For the apostles, the “Christian life-style is not a matter of an autonomous ethic, but is rather to be understood only as the response to the prior gift of salvation through God himself” (ibid).

Jan
2018

The Greek word “ἐγκόπτω”

Limited to Acts 24:4; Rom. 15:22; Gal. 5:7 (some manuscripts); 1 Thess. 2:18; 1 Pet. 3:7, the Greek verb “enkopto” meant “weary,” “hinder,” “prevent.”

With the exception of Acts 24:4, this word always describes the hindering of a spiritual activity.

Jan
2018

The Greek word “ἐγκομβόομαι”

Limited to 1 Pet. 5:5, the Greek verb “enkomboomai” meant “”cover oneself with” or “clothe oneself with.”  Christians should “clothe themselves with” humility.

In commenting on this word Spicq (1:404) said:  “A denominative verb formed from kombos, ‘knot, buckle,’ this biblical hapax means ‘attach, fasten.’  It evokes the large apron that workers or slaves fitted or fastened to their tunics to protect them.”  This term tells us a “Christian should present himself before his neighbor in an attitude of modesty, reserve, and self-renunciation, thanks to a humility that is solidly fitted and manifest” (ibid).

Jan
2018

The Greek word “ἐθνικῶς”

Jesus took some breaks with His disciples (Mk. 6:31) and so do we.  These studies are scheduled to resume on 2/12.  We hope you will rejoin us at that time.

Limited to Gal. 2:14, the Greek adverb “ethnikos” meant “live like a heathen” or “live like a Gentile.”

While in Antioch, Peter, in violation of Jewish ritual regulations, ate with Gentiles and was thus “like the Gentiles.”

Dec
2017

Have a great Christmas and wonderful new year –

These posts will resume on January 2, 2018 and we pray you will rejoin us at that time.

The Greek word “ἔγκλημα”

Limited to Acts 23:29 and Acts 25:16, the Greek noun “enklema” meant “accusation” or “charge.”  Acts 23:29 uses “enklema” in the general sense of “reproach or charge” while Acts 25:16 uses this term in a legal sense.

Dec
2017

The Greek word “ἐγκεντρίζω”

Limited to Rom. 11:17, 19, 23-24, the Greek verb “enkentrizo” meant “graft in.”  In commenting on this word Thayer (p. 166) said: “Paul likens the heathen who by becoming Christians have been admitted into fellowship with the people for whom the Messianic salvation is destined, to scions from wild trees inserted into a cultivated stock.”