Mar
2018

“εἰκοσιτέσσαρες”

Limited to Rev. 5:8, 14 and sometimes expressed as two separate words versus the compound in this post, “eikositessares” was the number twenty-four.

Feb
2018

The Greek word “εἰκῇ”

Limited to Mt. 5:22 (some manuscripts); Rom. 13:4; 1 Cor. 15:2; Gal. 3:4; 4:11; Col. 2:18, the Greek adverb “eike” meant “in vain,” “without cause,” “for nothing,” “to no purpose.”

It is possible to be angry “without cause” (Mt. 5:22).  Civil government does not bear the sword in “vain” (Rom. 13:4).  Paul spoke of  Christians having “vain” faith (1 Cor. 15:2; Gal. 3:4; 4:11).

Feb
2018

The Greek noun “εἴδωλον”

Limited to Acts 7:41; 15:20; Rom. 2:22; 1 Cor. 8:4, 7; 10:19; 12:2; 2 Cor. 6:16; 1 Thess. 1:9; 1 Jn. 5:21; Rev. 9:20, the Greek noun “eidolon” meant “image” or “idol.”  Idols have been a problem for a long time (Acts 7:41).  They have no real existence but are used by evil powers to lead people astray (1 Cor. 8:4).  They are also looked upon with great disfavor with God (1 Cor. 10:19-22).

Feb
2018

The Greek noun “εἰδωλολάτρης”

Limited to 1 Cor. 5:10-11; 6:9; 10:7; Eph. 5:5; Rev. 21:8; 22:15, the Greek noun “eidololatres” meant “idolater.”  Some of the unsaved are “idolaters” (1 Cor. 5:10).  If those involved with idolatry do not repent and become Christians, they will be eternally lost (1 Cor. 6:9).  Covetousness is one way to be guilty of this sin (Col. 3:5).  Idolaters are listed with liars and the sexually immoral in Rev. 21:8; 22:15.

Feb
2018

The noun “εἰδωλολατρεία”

Limited to 1 Cor. 10:14; Gal. 5:20; Col. 3:5; 1 Pet. 4:3, the Greek noun “eidololatreia” meant “idolatry.”  Idolatry is designating something as God when this is not true.

One example of idolatry is covetousness (Col. 3:5).  Idolatry is something from which Christians must flee (1 Cor. 10:14) because it is a work of the flesh (Gal. 5:20).  Peter listed this sin with other wrongs in 1 Pet. 4:3.

Feb
2018

The Greek adjective “εἰδωλόθυτος”

Limited to Acts 15:29; 21:25; 1 Cor. 8:1, 4, 7, 10; 10:19, 28; Rev. 2:14, 20, the Greek adjective “eidolothutos” meant “sacrificed to idols.”  Thayer (p. 174) said this word denoted “the flesh left over from the heathen sacrifices; it was either eaten at feasts, or sold (by the poor and the miserly) in the market.”

Feb
2018

The Greek noun “εἰδωλεῖον”

Limited to 1 Cor. 8:10, the Greek noun “eidoleion” meant “idol’s temple.”   As stated in my commentary on First Corinthians 8:

Ancient writers had more than one word to describe temples.  One term (naos) was respectful (it described the inner part of a temple).  A second word (hieron, 1 Cor. 9:13) often described the whole temple area.  A third term is found here in 1 Cor. 8:10 (eidoleion).  Thayer (p. 174) defined this word as “an idol’s temple, temple consecrated to idols.”  Although this third word for temple is found only once in the New Testament, it is used in other forms (types of speech).  Readers can find eidolothutos—an adjective, eidololatreia­—a noun, eidololatres—a noun, and eidolon—a noun.  It is easy to see how each of these related words is closely related to the English word “idolatry.”  Christians have little in common with the worship of false gods.
If a Christian was comfortable entering into a heathen temple and eating a meal, what would happen if he was seen by a fellow Christian who thought such an activity was wrong?  This second and weaker brother could very well reason, “If another Christian can go to the house of a false god it must be okay.  I will do as he does and eat idol meat.”  What we see here is really a form of peer pressure, not knowledge and spiritual confidence (Christians would copy what fellow believers were doing).  In fact, the ASV and KJV say the weak Christian’s conscience is “emboldened” (the ASV footnote says “builded up”).

Feb
2018

The Greek verb “εἶδον”

The verb “eidon” meant “visit,” “saw,” “perceived.”  This term is often translated “behold” in the KJV (examples of this include Mt. 1:20, 23; 2:13; 4:11).

“In the NT horáō and eídon are the most common verbs for seeing.  The former occurs 113 times, the latter some 350 times in the Gospels, Acts, and Revelation.   eídon is less common in John, mainly because the perfect heṓraka is preferred” (Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, Abridged Edition, p. 710).  “The two verbs horáō and eídon have a broad range of meaning” (ibid).