Nov
2017

“Ἑβραῖος”

Limited to Acts 6:1; 2 Cor. 11:22; Phil. 3:5, Hebraios” described someone who was a Hebrew.  This designation is far less common in the New Testament than the word “Jew.”

The Dictionary of New Testament Theology (2:305) claims this “is an old word of uncertain meaning,” and “was used by other peoples in the old stories sometimes in a derogatory manner, sometimes by Israel in dealings with foreigners in a self-depreciating manner” (ibid).

Nov
2017

The number ἕβδομος

Limited to Jn. 4:52; Heb. 4:4; Jude 14; Rev. 8:1; 10:7; 11:15; 16:17; 21:20, the number “hebdomos” meant “seventh.”  This word describes an hour of the day (Jn. 4:52), a day of the week (Heb. 4:4), a person in a genealogy (Jude 14), and various items in the book of Revelation.

Nov
2017

The Greek word “ἑβδομηκοντάκις”

Limited to Mt. 18:22, the Greek adverb “hebdomekontakis” is used in Peter’s question about forgiveness.  Whether this adverb is understood to mean “seventy times” or “seventy times seven,” the point is clear.  Jesus used a symbolic figure to describe unlimited forgiveness.

Nov
2017

The Greek word “ἑβδομηκονταέξ”

Limited to Acts 27:37, “hebdomekontaex” meant “seventy-six.”  A ship which ran aground on the shore of Melita had two hundred and seventy-six people on board.

Nov
2017

“ἑβδομήκοντα”

Limited to Lk. 10:1, 17; Acts 7:14; 23:23; 27:37, “hebdomekonta” meant “seventy.”  Moses appointed seventy men (Num. 11:16) and Jesus did the same (Lk. 10:1, 17.  Some versions like the ESV have chosen 72 instead of 70).

Seventy has been called a “sacred number” (Exegetical Dictionary of the New Testament, 1:369).

Nov
2017

The Greek word “ἐάω”

Found thirteen times in the New Testament (Mt. 24:43; Lk. 4:41; 22:51; Acts 5:38; 14:16; 16:7; 19:30; 23:32; 27:32, 40; 28:4; 1 Cor. 10:13; Rev. 2:20), the Greek verb “eao” meant “leave alone,” “let be,” “permit,” “allow.”  The primary meaning of this word is “permit” or “allow.”

This term is associated with subjects such as a military escort (Acts 23:32), theft (Mt. 24:43), and the work done by seamen (Acts 27:32).  In 1 Cor. 10:13, “permit” is a good expression of Paul’s thought.